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Monash Museum of Computing History

The Monash Museum of Computing History, Monash University is an exciting visual exploration of computer technology and how it has changed our lives. The Museum has a display of computer technology ranging from the first calculating systems to the introduction of computers with memory. A visit to the Museum highlights how quickly computers have become an accepted part of our world and forces us to think about the impact they have had on our society.

The Museum is a project of the Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University and aims to provide a visual display of computing history as well as establish a reference collection demonstrating the use of computing technology at the university. The Museum has a growing collection of historical computer technology. If you are interested in donating material, please contact the Director, .

The display is available for general viewing. School and group tours of the Museum can be arranged.

Display open hours: Monday-Friday 9am - 5pm in the Foyer, Level 2, Building B, Caulfield campus, Monash University

New on this site

Current news and events

A history of the formation of the Faculty of IT at Monash

We have published a new book, entitled From Ferranti to Faculty: Information Technology at Monash University, 1960 to 1990 by Sarah Rood examines the background of the different schools and departments that are now combined to form the Faculty. The book is available from Monash ePress, see the book table of contents can be seen, and the book can be bought here.

Computing in Melbourne: A Historical Tour

Find out about Melbourne's remarkable links with the earliest days of computing. Join one of our organised tours, or do a self-guided tour. Keep an eye on the website http://www.csse.monash.edu.au/~gfarr/tour/ for information on these tours in 2009. The website also describes the first tours of this kind, held in 2008.


Monash University celebrated the 50th Anniversary of Clayton campus

In 2008 Monash University held a series of events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the creation of the University. Please check the Monash website for details.

Recent donations

Ferranti technical drawings and handwritten notes

MMoCH 2008.015  B/W Photograph of work floor at Ferranti Ltd. c.1962.

The Museum was very pleased to receive papers in September 2008 from the estate of Mrs Irene Bajer who worked at Ferranti Ltd in Manchester, England from 1958-1963 prior to migrating to Australia. She was originally from Poland and had been involved with the Polish Army during World War II. Settling and marrying in England after the war, Irene became a Supervisor Chargehand Inspector for Ferranti Ltd.  Irene worked in the production of “Atlas” which was the largest computer produced by Ferranti. The papers include a variety of technical drawings and handwritten notes re specifications for “Atlas”. This collection is particularly interesting as Monash’s first computer was also produced by Ferranti during this period. We would like to thank Mrs Tricia Spargo for presenting the papers to the Museum.

MMoCH 2008.015  B/W Photograph of work floor at Ferranti Ltd. c.1962.

MONADS PC returns

The Monash Museum of Computing History (MMoCH) was delighted to receive a MONADS PC computer this week. This much-traveled machine was built at Monash, was sent to Sydney University, taken to Ulm, and has now (30 years on) returned from the University of Ulm in Germany, see the full story at the Faculty of Information Technology news and events site.

Recent past events

Book launch - August 2008

The Faculty of Information Technology, Monash University launched a new book, a history of the Faculty August 2008. This book, entitled From Ferranti to Faculty: Information Technology at Monash University, 1960 to 1990 by Sarah Rood examines the background of the different schools and departments that are now combined to form the Faculty. The book is available from Monash ePress, at this web site.

Special Seminar – Thursday April 17, 2008

The Monash Museum of Computing History announced a public seminar at Caulfield campus, Monash University. This event was open to the general public and members of the Faculty Alumni as well as University staff and researchers.

MyLifeBits - an Experiment in Lifetime Storage
Special Seminar hosted by the Monash Museum of Computing History and Monash University e-Research Centre with guest speaker, Gordon Bell.

Program of events

All events were in Building B, Level 2, Caulfield campus, Monash University.

Seminar details

Gordon Bell did speak about his latest work in developing the MyLifeBits project which is an experiment in using multimedia to record every aspect of his daily life. This includes everything he has accumulated, written, photographed and presented. The digital world has presented us all with a vast amount of ephemera. The MyLifeBits project seeks to record these in a personal transaction processing database.

Gordon has a long career in the computing industry starting with 23 years (1960-1983) at Digital Equipment Corporation as Vice President of Research and Development, where he was responsible for Digital's products. He was the architect of various mini- and time-sharing computers (e.g. the PDP-6) and led the development of DEC's VAX and the VAX Computing Environment.

Currently Gordon is a principal researcher in Microsoft Research Silicon Valley, working in the San Francisco  Laboratory.

Workshop details

Gordon gave an informal talk on “building computer museums” for supporters of the Monash Museum of Computing History (MMoCH).  Gordonstarted the Computer History Museum when he was working at Digital Equipment Corporation and realized that the history of computing needed to be preserved. The Computer History Museum is now housed in Silicon Valley, California.  Gordon spoke about his involvement with establishing theMuseum and guiding it through its various stages of development.