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FIT3077 Software engineering: architecture and design - Semester 1, 2010

Chief Examiner:

Dr David Squire
Senior Lecturer
Phone: +61 3 990 59013
Fax: +61 3 990 55159

Lecturer(s) / Leader(s):

Clayton

Dr David Squire
Senior Lecturer
Phone: +61 3 990 59013
Fax: +61 3 990 55159

Contact hours: Consultation hours: 2:00-4:00pm Tuesdays. Making an appointment via email is strongly advised.

Malaysia

Mr Thomas O'Daniel

Introduction

Welcome to FIT3077 'Software Engineering: Architecture and Design'. This 6 point unit is core to both the Bachelor of Software Engineering and the Bachelor of Computer Science. In this unit you will learn about both large and small scale software architecture and design, including both design and analysis patterns, architectural patterns such as Model-View-Controller, and current hot topics such as service-oriented architectures and commercial-off-the-shelf components (COTS). You will learn about incremental design improvement through refactoring. These designs, patterns, and architectures will be described using the Unified Modeling Language (UML).

Unit synopsis

This unit builds on introductory units to analysis and design. It provides the professional software engineer with advanced knowledge and skills in high-level architectural design, its theoretical foundations, industrial best practice, and relevant application context. In the software life-cycle, software architecture sits between analysis/specification and design/implementation. The field of software architecture has come of age with a thriving research community and numerous high-level models, methods, tools and practices widely used in industry.

Learning outcomes

At the completion of this unit students will have -
A knowledge and understanding of:
  • modelling and design of flexible software at the architectural level. Basics of model-driven architecture;
  • Architectural styles and patterns, Middleware & application frameworks;
  • product lines. Design using COTs software;
  • configurations and configuration management;
  • in-depth look at software design, design patterns;
  • design of distributed systems using middleware;
  • design for qualities such as performance, safelty, reusability etc;
  • evaluation and evolution of designs, reverse engineering.
Developed attitudes that enable them to:
  • apply variety of design pattern;
  • appreciate analysis fundamentals;
  • analyse well-formedness (completeness, consistency, robustness, etc);
  • analyse correctness (eg. static analysis,simulation etc.);
  • analyse quality requirements (eg. root cause analysis, safety, usability, security, etc.).
Developed the skills to:
  • take requirements for simple systems and develop software architectures and designs at a high level;
  • use configuration management tools effectively;
  • apply a variety of frameworks and architectures in designing software.

Contact hours

2 hrs lectures/wk, 1 hr tutorial/wk

Workload

Workload commitments are:

  • two-hour lecture and
  • one-hour practice class
  • A minimum of 2-3 hours of personal study per one hour of contact time in order to satisfy the reading and assignment expectations.

Unit relationships

Prerequisites

FIT2001 (or CSE2305) and FIT2004 (or CSE2304)

Prohibitions

CSE3308

Teaching and learning method

Teaching approach

There will be two one-hour lectures per week in this unit. During lectures, the lecturer will present the theory underlying the topics in the unit, and illustrate this with concrete examples.

 There will also be a one-hour 'practice class' for the unit. The lecturer and tutors (if any) will be present for the practice class. Students are expected to work on example problems or their assignments during the practice class, and ask the teaching staff for assistance when necessary. Teaching staff may occasionally choose to explain a common problem to the whole class.

 Note that a practice class is not a tutorial. It is time for you to work on the example problems provided, with a staff member present to answer any questions you might have. To get value from the practice class, it is vital that you attempt the example problems provided.

 The practice classes are intended to be the primary mechanism for consultation in this unit.

Timetable information

For information on timetabling for on-campus classes please refer to MUTTS, http://mutts.monash.edu.au/MUTTS/

Tutorial allocation

On-campus students should register for tutorials/laboratories using the Allocate+ system: http://allocate.its.monash.edu.au/

Unit Schedule

Week Date* Topic References/Readings Key dates
1 01/03/10 Introduction to FIT3077; What is Software Architecture?; Object-Oriented Analysis using UML Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R. Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003, Ch. 2.; Fowler, Martin, UML Distilled, Addison-Wesley, 1997, 2000, or 2003.  
2 08/03/10 Object-Oriented Analysis using UML Fowler, Martin, UML Distilled, Addison-Wesley, 1997, 2000, or 2003. Assignment One specification available
3 15/03/10 Principles of Object-Oriented Analysis and Design; Design Patterns Page-Jones, Meilir, Fundamentals of Object-Oriented Design in UML, Addison-Wesley, 2000 (Ch. 8, 9); Gamma, Erich; Helm, Richard; Johnson, Ralph; and Vlissides, John, Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, Addison-Wesley, 1995, Chs. 1, 3, 4, 5.  
4 22/03/10 Principles of Object-Oriented Design Martin, Robert C., Design Principles and Design Patterns, 2000 (available via Blackboard). Assignment One due
5 29/03/10 Principles of Object-Oriented Design Martin, Robert C., Design Principles and Design Patterns, 2000 (available via Blackboard).; Martin, Robert C., Granularity, 1997 (available via Blackboard). Assignment Two, Stage One specification available
Mid semester break
6 12/04/10 Design Principles and Design Patterns Martin, Robert C., Design Principles and Design Patterns, 2000 (available via Blackboard).  
7 19/04/10 Analysis Patterns; Refactoring Fowler, Martin, Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models, Addison-Wesley, 1997 (Chs. 1, 2); Fowler, Martin, Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, Addison-Wesley, 1999, Chs. 1, 2, 7.  
8 26/04/10 Software Architecture; Architectural Structures Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R. Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003, Ch. 2.  
9 03/05/10 Documenting Software Architectures; The Model-View-Controller Architectural Pattern Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R. Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003, Ch. 9.; Microsoft Corporation, Model-View-Controller, Microsoft Patterns & Practices Developer Center, 2008. Assignment Two, Stage One due; Assignment Two, Stage Two specification available
10 10/05/10 Architecture and Design with COTS components Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R. Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003, Ch. 18.  
11 17/05/10 Software Product Lines: Re-using Architectural Assets Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R. Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003, Ch. 14.  
12 24/05/10 Service Orientation; Service-Oriented Architecture Allen, Paul and Schlamann, Hermann, Service Orientation: Winning Strategies and Best Practices, Cambridge University Press, 2006, Chs. 1, 3, 7 Assignment Two, Stage Two due
13 31/05/10 Revision    

*Please note that these dates may only apply to Australian campuses of Monash University. Off-shore students need to check the dates with their unit leader.

Improvements to this unit

The material of Service-Oriented Architectures will be updated, and presented from a more neutral view-point.

Unit Resources

Prescribed text(s) and readings

There is no set text for this unit.

Recommended text(s) and readings

  • Fowler M., UML Distilled: A Brief Guide to the Standard Object Modeling Language, Addison-Wesley, 3rd ed., 2003.
  • Gamma E., Helm R., Johnson R., Vlissides J. M., Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software, Addison-Wesley, 1994.
  • Martin R. C., Design Principles and Design Patterns, 2000.
    • This and other Robert C. Martin articles are made available through the MUSO site for the unit.
  • Fowler M., Analysis Patterns: Reusable Object Models, Addison-Wesley, 1996.
  • Fowler M., Beck K., Brant J., Opdyke W., Roberts  D., Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code, Addison-Wesley, 1999.
  • Bass L., Clements P. and Kazman R., Software Architecture in Practice, Addison-Wesley, 2nd ed., 2003.
    • full text available electronically through the Monash library
  • Allen, P and Schlamann, H., Service Orientation: Winning Strategies and Best Practices, Cambridge University, 2006.
    • full text available electronically through the Monash library

Required software and/or hardware

You will need access to:

  • A tool for creating UML diagrams, such as Rational Rose, Visual Paradigm, etc.
  • An object-oriented programming language

On-campus students may use the software that is installed in the computing labs. Information about computer use for students is available from the ITS Student Resource Guide in the Monash University Handbook.

Equipment and consumables required or provided

Students studying off-campus are required to have the minimum system configuration specified by the Faculty as a condition of accepting admission, and regular Internet access.On-campus students, and those studying at supported study locations may use the facilities available in the computing labs.Information about computer use for students is available from the ITS Student Resource Guide in the Monash University Handbook.You will need to allocate up to 9 hours per week for use of a computer, including time for newsgroups/discussion groups.

Study resources

Study resources we will provide for your study are:

  • Weekly detailed lecture notes outlining the learning objectives, discussion of the content, and required readings;
  • Regular practice class exercises, with feedback and solutions provided in the practice classes;
  • Assignment specifications;
  • A sample examination and suggested solutions presented in the week 13 lectures;
  • Discussion groups;
  • This Unit Guide outlining the administrative information for the unit;
  • The unit web site on MUSO, where resources outlined above will be made available.

Assessment

Overview

Examination (3 hours): 40%; In-semester assessment: 60%

Faculty assessment policy

To pass a unit which includes an examination as part of the assessment a student must obtain:

  • 40% or more in the unit's examination, and
  • 40% or more in the unit's total non-examination assessment, and
  • an overall unit mark of 50% or more.

If a student does not achieve 40% or more in the unit examination or the unit non-examination total assessment, and the total mark for the unit is greater than 50% then a mark of no greater than 49-N will be recorded for the unit.

Assignment tasks

Assignment coversheets

Assignment coversheets are available via "Student Forms" on the Faculty website: http://www.infotech.monash.edu.au/resources/student/forms/
You MUST submit a completed coversheet with all assignments, ensuring that the plagiarism declaration section is signed.

Assignment submission and return procedures, and assessment criteria will be specified with each assignment.

  • Assignment task 1
    Title:
    UML Design Assignment
    Description:
    Students will be provided with software requirements scenarios for which they must produce a conceptual design for an object-oriented solution. This design must be described using UML diagrams. The purpose of this assignment is to reinforce UML knowledge and ensure that students are ready for the large assignment.
    Weighting:
    20%
    Due date:
    Week 4
  • Assignment task 2
    Title:
    Team Software Architecture Assignment
    Description:
    This is a team assignment. Students will work on it in pairs. This assignment will have two stages, each requiring students to analyse a problem, design a solution, and implement it in an object-oriented programming language. The second stage will build on the first, and the ease with which the students' stage one design can be extended for stage two will depend on appropriate use of architecture and design knowledge presented in this unit.

    The main focus of the assignment is on the application of the design patterns and principles presented in lectures. Simply meeting the external functional requirements for the system is not sufficient to pass this assignment.
    Weighting:
    40%
    Due date:
    Stage1 - Week 9, Stage 2 - Week 12

Examination

  • Weighting: 40%
    Length: 3 hours
    Type (open/closed book): Closed book

See Appendix for End of semester special consideration / deferred exams process.

Due dates and extensions

Please make every effort to submit work by the due dates. It is your responsibility to structure your study program around assignment deadlines, family, work and other commitments. Factors such as normal work pressures, vacations, etc. are not regarded as appropriate reasons for granting extensions. Students are advised to NOT assume that granting of an extension is a matter of course.

Students requesting an extension for any assessment during semester (eg. Assignments, tests or presentations) are required to submit a Special Consideration application form (in-semester exam/assessment task), along with original copies of supporting documentation, directly to their lecturer within two working days before the assessment submission deadline. Lecturers will provide specific outcomes directly to students via email within 2 working days. The lecturer reserves the right to refuse late applications.

A copy of the email or other written communication of an extension must be attached to the assignment submission.

Refer to the Faculty Special consideration webpage or further details and to access application forms: http://www.infotech.monash.edu.au/resources/student/equity/special-consideration.html

Late assignment

Assignments received after the due date will receive a mark of M*(0.9)^n, where M is the raw mark for the assignment, and n is the number of days that the assignment is late (including weekends).

Return dates

Students can expect assignments to be returned within two weeks of the submission date or after receipt, whichever is later.

Appendix

Please visit the following URL: http://www.infotech.monash.edu.au/units/appendix.html for further information about:

  • Continuous improvement
  • Unit evaluations
  • Communication, participation and feedback
  • Library access
  • Monash University Studies Online (MUSO)
  • Plagiarism, cheating and collusion
  • Register of counselling about plagiarism
  • Non-discriminatory language
  • Students with disability
  • End of semester special consideration / deferred exams